SOURCE: http://www.FORAMS2010.uni-bonn.de/sites/sessions/B3.php
Logo

page title

top
Session Session Title Convenor(s)
B3 Ontogenetic, taphonomic and diagenetic shell features: What stories can they tell?
bottom
top

Summary

Studying the micropaleontologic record requires understanding of both biological and postmortem conditions and processes. The morphology and geochemistry of the shell can reflect where the foraminifer lived or the kinds of food they consumed. The predominance of perfectly formed and well preserved shells tell us that environmental conditions were favorable during the life of the protist and were also favorable for shell preservation. Moreover, shell damage and unusual shell features, whether they occurred during life or post-mortem, can provide much additional information. The best known changes in shell features are coiling direction changes that reflect environmental conditions. Ontogenetic anomalies, including shell deformities, are relatively rare in most populations, but occur much more frequently in naturally or anthropogenically stressed environments, including hypersaline or polluted settings. Drill holes and certain kinds of shell breakage or dissolution can reflect how the foraminifer died, such as by predation or asexual reproduction. Taphonomic alteration can reflect such processes as micritization, bioerosion, and kinds and intensities of transport. Diagenetic alterations can include dissolution, mineralogical replacement and characteristic cementation. We invite contributions that explore features associated with foraminiferal shells that are unusual, little reported, or enigmatic.
bottom
top
previous: B2 Session Overview or Timetable next: B4
bottom
top
This site is optimized for Firefox 3.x
bottom